Interactivity, Performance, and Emotion

Abstract

Audiences usually consider emotional responses to be the most important part of their experience of art, particularly popular arts. Emotional responses are largely based on the audience’s observations of the artwork’s formal elements; in the case of the visual arts, these elements are primarily images. Narrative visual artworks, such as film, present images that can be observed by the audience using three frameworks to interpret their perception into meaningful observations. One image can be perceived as a represented object, a representation in itself, or an aspect of reality. Traditional artworks invite the audience to observe their images in the role of observer, and the audience’s emotional responses are based on their observations. In contrast, interactive artworks invite the audience to additionally perform the role of interactor, who co-creates the artwork with the initial artist. Thus, while traditional artworks generate emotional responses based on the audience’s observation of another artist’s work, interactive artworks can generate emotional responses based on the audience’s observation of their own authorized performances during engagement with an artwork.

Publication
Arts Study [第九辑]